Category Archives: Teaching Russian History

Video Conference Class with HSE

In an interesting interview, Irina Filatova, a professor of African history at the National Research University-Higher School of Economics (HSE), offers her thoughts about the continued importance of de-Stalinization for Russia and discusses a new course she and I will … Continue reading

Posted in Teaching Russian History | 3 Comments

Pussy Riot as Modern Day Skomorokhi

This is a guest post by Sean Guillory that originally appeared on Sean’s Russia Blog. The trial and conviction of Pussy Riot has sparked a number of historical analogies. Never wanting for hyperbole, the Washington Post, among others in the … Continue reading

Posted in Current events in the Putin Era, Medieval Russia | Leave a comment

“Under the beneficent rays of Soviet national policy…”

I spent some time this past week preparing for my fall class on the Soviet Union.  Each time I’ve taught it here at Hawai’i, I’ve made use of an unique resource at our Library, the “Social Movements Collection,” which is … Continue reading

Posted in Soviet Era 1917-1991, Stalinism, Teaching Russian History, Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Death and Redemption – On Images

First, I must thank my colleague and co-blogger Andrew Jenks for setting up this blog conversation here at Russian History Blog. As an academic author, I have found the wait for journal reviews of my book to be excruciating. The … Continue reading

Posted in Death and Redemption, Gulag, Soviet Era 1917-1991, Stalinism, Teaching Russian History | 3 Comments

Policing Sexuality in Medieval Russia

The Center for Medieval Studies has a very visible presence at Fordham University where I teach. In the history department alone, medievalist faculty and graduate students maintain a healthy and vibrant intellectual life. Although I am a historian of modern … Continue reading

Posted in Gender and Sexuality, Imperial Russia, Medieval Russia, Teaching Russian History | Leave a comment

Three Songs About Motherland

My university (California State University, Long Beach) is screening a number of documentary films about Russia this semester, including three films from the esteemed documentary film maker Marina Goldovskaya: A Taste of Freedom (1991, 46 min.), A Bitter Taste of Freedom … Continue reading

Posted in Cold War, Films, Nostalgia and Memory, Post-Soviet Russia, Soviet Era 1917-1991, Teaching Russian History | 1 Comment

Pussy Riot Arrest and Byzantine Church-State Relations Today

[http://www.1tvnet.ru/images/news_pic_Krasotin%2520sam%2520skoro%2520nauchitsya/735776%20(1).gif] Five members of the feminist punk rock group Pussy Riot have been arrested for a “punk prayer” at the Church of the Savior in Moscow. Two are being held until late April with threats of sentences up to seven … Continue reading

Posted in Current events in the Putin Era, Imperial Russia, Nostalgia and Memory, Post-Soviet Russia, Russian Orthodoxy, Teaching Russian History | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

New Teaching Russian History Blog

Karl Qualls Associate Professor of Russian History at Dickinson College and author of From Ruins to Reconstruction: Urban Identity in Soviet Sevastopol after World War II (Cornell, 2009) has just launched Teaching History, a new blog that will focus heavily on … Continue reading

Posted in Teaching Russian History, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Stalin’s Daughter

The death of Svetlana Alliluyeva in a nursing home in Wisconsin brings to a close a fascinating and tragic life. The documentary film maker Lana Parshina in 2007 had the good luck of landing one of the few extensive interviews … Continue reading

Posted in Cold War, Films, Stalinism, Teaching Russian History | 7 Comments

The Summer of Terror

I just showed a documentary for a group of students here at Long Beach State by Julia Ivanova entitled “Moscow Freestyle.” Completed in 2006, it provides an interesting perspective on the terrifying summer of 2004 in Moscow — and one … Continue reading

Posted in Post-Soviet Russia, Teaching Russian History, Terrorism | 4 Comments

Aftermath!

Just a quick update to my last post on “Ivan the Terrible and the American adolescent.” The show in which I appeared (http://www.spike.com/full-episodes/59fkzw/deadliest-warrior-ivan-the-terrible-vs-hern-n-cort-s-season-3-ep-307) declared Hernan Cortes the victor over Ivan the Terrible. Ivan’s weapons were superior but psychological factors, once … Continue reading

Posted in Films, Russian History in Popular Culture, Teaching Russian History | 1 Comment

Call for Web-based Teaching Resources

Given my own penchant for sharing YouTube videos here at Russian History Blog and the recent posts from Miriam Dobson and Alison Smith sharing some phenomenal historical photographs, it seems appropriate to start gathering a list of everyone’s favorite online … Continue reading

Posted in Digital Russian History, Teaching Russian History, YouTube in Russian History Classes | 10 Comments

Cartier-Bresson in Moscow

Over the Easter weekend, I was reading The Guardian and came across a full-page photograph taken by Henri Cartier-Bresson on a visit to the Soviet Union in 1954. This stunning photograph was used the following year as the front cover … Continue reading

Posted in Digital Russian History, Nostalgia and Memory, Soviet Era 1917-1991, Teaching Russian History, Uncategorized | 11 Comments

Rapping about the Divided Memory of Victory

Today marks the 66th anniversary of Victory Day. As Sean Guillory notes in a must-read post, victory, like so many other aspects of 20th century east European history, is remembered quite differently in many post-Soviet and post-Communist states. He writes: … Continue reading

Posted in Digital Russian History, Soviet Era 1917-1991, Teaching Russian History, World War II, YouTube in Russian History Classes | 2 Comments

Chernobyl at 25

The recent nuclear disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi brought the Chernobyl nuclear meltdown back into an often forgetful public consciousness. Although we will no doubt soon forget these events again, especially amidst the insane amount of coverage focused on royal … Continue reading

Posted in Chernobyl, Digital Russian History, Soviet Era 1917-1991, Teaching Russian History | 5 Comments

YouTube of the Week – Putin Rules

So, my YouTube of the Week feature would be better if it was actually a weekly feature. Unfortunately, a bit of illness has kept me offline for much of the last few weeks. So, when the YouTube of the Week … Continue reading

Posted in Digital Russian History, Post-Soviet Russia, Teaching Russian History, YouTube in Russian History Classes | 1 Comment

From the Classroom: Teaching Russian Texts in European History Courses

This semester I’m teaching a new course entitled “Sex in Modern Europe,” which I developed on the basis of some research I did a few years ago when co-authoring a book with Annette Timm. The course has seven two-week units: … Continue reading

Posted in Teaching Russian History, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

YouTube of the Week – A Man Like Putin with English Subtitles

Students absolutely adore all of the fun you can have talking about the cult of Putin.  Perhaps none are as fun as this well-known video of “I Want a Man Like Putin.”  This particular version includes English subtitles. I use … Continue reading

Posted in Post-Soviet Russia, Teaching Russian History, YouTube in Russian History Classes | 2 Comments

New Series – New Books in Russia and Eurasia

For some time now, I’ve followed and listened with great interest to Marshall Poe‘s terrific series of podcast interviews at New Books in History.  Poe, a historian of early modern Russia, interviews a wide variety of historians including many in … Continue reading

Posted in Digital Russian History, Teaching Russian History | Leave a comment

YouTube of the Week – Sand Animation of WWII

One of the features I plan for the blog will be my “YouTube of the Week.”  I will share many of the videos that I use in my course on the history of the Soviet Union and the post-Soviet world … Continue reading

Posted in Teaching Russian History, YouTube in Russian History Classes | 4 Comments